skycraper fall
Two brothers Alcides and Edgar Moreno were cleaning windows 47 stories up, when their cleaning platform violently jerked. The cables securing the scaffold snapped.
This was another routine window cleaning for the brothers; they had done this a thousand times over 12 years. They were not wearing safety harnesses as they washed the New York apartment building’s windows.
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The brothers fell 550 feet to the pavement below. Edgar, 30, was killed instantly. Married father of three, 37 years Alcides, a married father of three, was sitting up on the sidewalk when rescuers arrived. He had multiple ­fractures and damage to his spinal cord. Doctors put him into an induced coma; no one believed he would survive.
Three weeks later Alcides woke from his coma and reached out for his wife. Four months later, he checked out of the Kessler Rehab Center in New Jersey, walking on his own two feet.
“I don’t know what adjective you’d care to use, unprecedented, extraordinary,” said Dr Philip Barrie, from New York-Presbyterian Hospital. “If you are a believer in miracles, this would be one. I’ve seen it all – or at least I think I have – until something like this happens.”
One brother died, on impact, the other brother sat up on the pavement. That same brother walked out of the hospital four months later. The doctors used every adjective from extraordinary to unprecedented to miracle, but no one ever said it could have been THEM.

 

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Lightening struck the airplane at 350 mph and 10,000 feet. After the right and left wings separated the airplane, carrying 92 passengers, quickly came apart over the Peruvian rain forest.
Chaos was all around her and she was still strapped to her seat. Within 60 horrifying seconds she fell thousands of feet. The airplane crashed in flames into a mountainous jungle terrain and Juliane Koepckeshe became the sole survivor of flight 508.
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Bruised, traumatized, a broken collarbone, cold and alone in the wilderness with only a few pieces of candy as food. One day of walking and she found a small stream and was able to keep hydrated. For eight days she followed the stream battling insects and an arm infection. On the ninth day she wandered upon an encampment and a few hours later she was rescued by loggers and airlifted to a hospital.
Could this one in a billion lightening strike be more than just a random happening by nature? Was her free fall from thousands of feet to land largely unharmed in the middle of nowhere the work of an unseen hand?  Or was it something else entirely… THEM