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The Altered (MoorRey Publishing; April 9, 2019). Author MG Hardie creates a world that is as familiar as it is unfamiliar. On the ground level, the world looks and operates like our reality. The reader soon realizes that there are two worlds superimposed over each other.
Destruction on Earth comes in the form of natural disasters. Yes. That earthquake is after you. Yes. The tornado only destroyed your home. These unseen culprits cross into our world through portals called the rifts. These larger, stronger, more powerful, anatomically similar beings come from a dark matter Earth. Their missions of death and destruction are in retaliation to the damage human have done to their world.
These beings murder Devon’s wife and daughter, but he has no time to grieve because being altered isn’t pretty, it isn’t easy. The Altered struggle to feel normal, to make sense of the world, to come to grips with being the only one who can see the otherworlders that dot the landscape and it’s frightening.
Driven by fear, he runs from these beings. Devon his chased around the world narrowly escaping disasters and death. Being altered allowed Devon to gain abilities to fight an enemy only he can see; an enemy that can’t be bargained with; an enemy that doesn’t intend to stop. Devon has mastered his new abilities and he has a plan.
The plan: go through the rift and convince these powerful beings not to carry out their murderous plan. Devon is going to need some help along the way.  Devon finds help in Joshua Dougan, a software developer and college friend and Gina Lawrence, a purchaser. With time running out and the odds stacked against humanity the choice between being altered and allowing the world to be destroyed becomes clear.
How will they react to knowing the whole truth?

Will the altered be enough?

Get Altered April 9th

ISBN: 978-0-9968296-5-6  (Paperback)

ISBN 978-0-9968296-7-0 (ebook)

 

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Devon Heathrow learns that humans are not alone in the universe and that unseen Otherworlders to blame for natural disasters that plague the earth. These Otherworlders murdered Devon Heathrow’s wife and daughter. These invisible, brutally powerful beings have chased him around the world. But now, it’s time to stop running and this time he’s not alone. Justice is beyond him, but help may not be.

Devon enlists the help of Gina Lawrence, a purchaser, and Joshua Dougan, a software developer and together they set out to save humanity from the plan of these otherworlders.

The altered enter the rift, as the conflict between humans and otherworlders grows. Devon, Joshua and Gina take faith, hope and doubt with them into this new world of wonder and mystery.

For the altered the stakes have never been higher and losing could cost them everything.

The Altered 3D

Get Altered

April 9th 

 

Karrine and Lil Wayne

Dear Karrine Steffans,

I ride for you. I really do. Most people have no idea why. Allow me to introduce myself. I’m Dr. Ebony Utley, a writer and an associate professor of communication at California State University Long Beach. I write and teach about popular culture and relationships. When Confessions of a Video Vixen dropped, I assigned it to my hip hop class and made all my students purchase it.

Confessions was important because it forced readers to contextualize a vixen’s life. After my students exhausted all the different ways they could call you a ho, I pushed them to move past their judgments and critique gendered double standards about sexuality. I demanded that they imagine how it would change them if they were sexually assaulted, abused, and abandoned as a young girl. I encouraged them to consider the conditions that lead to escapism through sex, drugs, alcohol, and hip hop fantasies. Your book was a perfect opportunity to discuss how and why women make choices in a man’s world. I asked them to respect the chutzpah of a woman not that much older than they were who put it all out there—haters be damned.

When it came time to build my brand, I modeled it after yours. Your early websites were my favorites. I learned form you that pink is a power color. You taught me how to be sexy and smart. I subscribe to the newsletter, buy the books, read the damn blog. In fact, The Vixen Manual is kinda like an Our Bodies, Ourselves for the hip hop generation. Okay, that’s an overstatement, but the pictures were a nice touch.

Your newest book How to Make Love to A Martian was a birthday gift to myself and it continues your prosex, prochoice advocacy. It was a brave decision to share your abortion story. It was also an important decision in a world where women’s rights to choose are being systematically stripped away.

Baby News: Fuck!

Four Weeks

And while Martian is a page-tuner, I’ve got to draw a line. The “love” that you and Lil Wayne have is dangerous. I know you have a niche. I know you have a core audience with expectations. I know you need to make that money, but I can’t ride for you and let other people think that your depiction of love is okay with me. Now, I generally don’t make a habit of telling people they love wrong. I’ve been flying around the country collecting definitions of love from women and children for my research, and I know there are as many definitions as there are people.

For my current project Shades of Infidelity, I’m interviewing women about their experiences with infidelity, and I’ve asked all of them to define love. I’ve learned so much about life and love that this isn’t me passing judgment on your open relationship with Lil Wayne. This is me telling you that a relationship that lacks mutual trust, respect, and honest communication isn’t a healthy love. Here come the spoilers. You define love as “the spirit of caring to the maximum level of shared connection.” Fine. Then you describe love with Wayne:

“Wayne didn’t want to know everything or anything at all, except that I loved him.”

“Wayne was loving me the way he wanted to love me, but I was loving him the way he needed to be loved.”

“He was a jealous and possessive man when it came to the women he loved. He never wanted to hear about other men. Ever. Even though all this women had no choice but to hear about all his other women and accept it.”

All bad, Karrine. Per your own definition, you’re coming up short. Is this what the maximum level of connection looks like? More importantly is this what the maximum level of connection looks like?

I know you’re both working and these representations are part of your jobs. I’m certain they fail to accurately reflect the extent of your relationship, but for all the babygirls that are fans of yours, I need them to know that:

  • When you can’t talk to your partner about that time he hurt your feelings when he flew you across the country, holed you up in a hotel, and never showed up to meet you, it’s not okay
  • Sleeping with his friend just to make him jealous instead of telling him that his getting everybody pregnant and you hearing about it on the street was hurtful, is not ideal.
  • Being in a relationship where there is no reciprocity is not a healthy relationship.

If you were just sexing Wayne for pleasure, that would be fine (although I’m not entirely sure what you see in him), but to call what you describe in Martian as love is not fine. Not. At. All.

Raw

I agree. Sometimes a man and a woman have an understanding that even they don’t understand. I have been there. But this is not that. There’s no understanding. He hurts your feelings. You swallow them. You try to move on. Love relationships require communication to achieve that understanding and that maximum level of connection. I need to communicate to you that you deserve better. You’ve been hurt. A lot. But don’t give up on yourself. Learn from your mistakes. Olivia Pope is wrong (but that’s another post). Love is not supposed to hurt more than it heals you. Love yourself first. Tell yourself the truth about this unhealthy relationship. If you can agree not to glamorize the pain anymore, I’ll agree to keep riding for you. Can you and I share that understanding?

Dr. Ebony Utley
The Woman with Ideas
theutleyexperience.com

MG Hardie’s  “It Ain’t Just the Size”, is thought-provoking book in which the female characters provide much spice. Hardie’s book is now featured on Afro-Editions.

“It Ain’t Just The Size” is the type of book that has people talking, not just about the love story, but because it doles out an amazing amount of life lessons. Hardie’s book is full of honest conversations, depth and passionate writing. “It Ain’t Just The Size”  is just as bold as it gets when confronting real world problems, as it is when giving solutions to many of America’s problems and at the same time the book has a solid love story. The books presentation of social and political issues does not detract from the love story between characters Lance and Princess.  “It Ain’t Just The Size” represents a new literary frontier with its style and diversity of characters from: men, lesbians, blacks, Hispanics and especially women all blended together with Hardie’s poetic dialogue. Hardie’s book is the featured book this month on Afro-Editions.com features. Afro-Editions.com represents timely information on all aspects of Black Literature.

MG Hardie will also be in attendance from 1-5pm at the 3rd Annual Authors Festival in Long Beach on April 2, 2011. The festival is free to the public and will feature over 20 authors

http://mghardie.com/

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Standing at a checkpoint in Israel with his assault rifle pointed over the heads of Palestinian Arabs, Marcus Hardie has to constantly remind himself, I am the good guy. Hardie was born and raised by his grandmother in a poor neighborhood on the outskirts of Los Angeles, a black youth stuck in the urban ghetto. He survived the ghetto and graduated from college, Marcus Hardie seemed destined for a future far from the violent surroundings of his childhood, an upbringing filled with urban gang warfare. He appointed to the Governor’s office. No one would have imagined, though, that he would soon become an elite anti-terror operative in one of the most violent places in the world: The Middle East.

 

From a gang life, to political future to being the 1st African American in the Israeli military, Black and Bulletproof is a journey of faith. This life of redemption is further proof that the bridge between worlds are not as far apart as we might think.  

 

 

A Memoir

Now Available

 New Horizon Press

 ISBN-13:978-0882823461

 

 

 

 

One Name, Two Fates

The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates is a memoir with a twist. Wes Moore is a young black man who rose from the drug, crime and poverty-stricken streets of Baltimore to attain prestigious academic honors. The twist is that Wes Moore is also a man who killed a Baltimore policeman while robbing a jewelry store. These two men grew up in the same neighborhood, both faced the same life obstacles, but they ended up on very different paths. One a Rhodes Scholar, interning for Condoleezza Rice, the other was behind bars for the rest of his life. It is the name of the latter individual that drove the author to reach out to him, to attempt to understand how they ended up in very different places.

Set in Baltimore we are given two boys with similar backgrounds and choices. The two Wes’ lived in the same neighborhood, both were raised by single mothers and both had early age brushes with law enforcement. The author believes that he is showing us a paralleling of lives by saying that what happened to the Other Wes Moore could have happened to him, this is not the case but it is interesting. “The Other Wes Moore” is a beautifully written narrative study on the effects of class and that alone makes it unique. Two black youths, who live in the same neighborhood, but in different classes.

The twist is more like a literary hook so-to-speak. Wes Moore’s mother was raised by college educated parents and she would have been a college graduate had it not been for forces beyond her control; his father was no slouch either although he dies early on. When Wes get too rambunctious she had the means to put him into military school. The Other Wes’ life was plagued with poverty and violence inside and outside his home, one day his father just takes off.  As a result of this familial disengagement he ends up having children by multiple women and selling drugs. Here, there is much to be said about “active parenting”.

The story is good, but I was quite disturbed and sadden that two hospitals allowed Race to place a major role in the deaths of two of the story’s characters.  Included in the book is a short ‘call to action’ by Tavis Smiley which will also, like the book, miss its intend mark. “The Other Wes Moore” will not reach the people who need to read it the most. This book is not filled with glorified violent acts, broad shouldered men, barely dressed married-single women, crime lords or thugs trying to get their paper. This book is not a copy of another book with changed names and places. No, it does not remain in the ghetto universe.

Throughout the book the Wes’ dialogue and we are exposed to the realest grit that life has to offer. We see the effects of not having positive mentors urban communities. We see the possibilities. We see the hope, but we also see the hopelessness. As the book ends we are left with these questions:  It is The Other Wes Moore’s fault that he was born into a lower class family? Was it his fault that he became a street urchin? Was it his mothers? His fathers? Or is it just easier to blame them instead the struggle in our society between, The haves and The have nots, The wants and The want mores?

Often these type of narratives make race or racism the deciding factor, “the man was holding me down” or “the opportunities were not there”, this is not so with Wes Moore’s book. These two children lived in the same neighborhood, shared the same obstacles and were divided only by Class. Class and it’s socioeconomic effects are subjects that very few want to discuss. Classism exist in every community, including the black ones. Wes Moore really didn’t need the hook, but I completely understand. And, he never really answers the question, How did this happen? In truth, he doesn’t need to because he knows that the answer is his upbringing. The book does not come across as arrogant, nor pretentious and I hope that this book will open discussions on the class warfare that is prevalent in our society. “The Other Wes Moore”  is less of a textbook for school and more of a textbook for life, so I am including a link to the author’s website, where there are resources for those that want to make a difference in their community, Wes Moore.

Wes Moore forces us to look at an overlooked, much maligned, under represented segment of our population, our children. They are ten percent of our population, but one hundred percent of our future. While adults spend countless hours with electronic doohickeys and bicker over race, politics and other created nonsense a child somewhere needs help with their homework, and another one needs to be told to put down the video game and pick up a book. What “The Other Wes Moore” points out more than anything else is that a child’s life course could be altered by acts as simple as that.

The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates  is an amazing book and I can’t stress it enough. The way this book is written is worth the read alone. The author’s style is simply beautiful. “The Other Wes Moore” makes you smile, and does much to restore some of the promise that modern literature has lost.

4.5 out of 5

Karen Hunter’s book “Stop Being Niggardly” loudly urges blacks to Stop all of the marching, all of the complaining and rise to action and fix what is wrong in our lives and our communities. This book is at its inspirational best when it talks about the “Quite Heroes” in our community and the need to “Write down the dream” in regards to setting goals and a plan of action. “Stop Being Niggardly” is filled with solid points to consider, statics to back up assertions and historical references for perspective.

Early on in the book Karen Hunter states that anger was her impetus for writing this book, and the book does reflect that anger along with her frustration in powerful lines such as, “I believe that black folks worry so much about what people are saying and calling us, but spend little time on what we are saying and calling each other and even less time on building out communities.”

Karen Hunter doesn’t just ‘Bring It’ when it comes to Black America, she also mixes it up with jaded Americans in general. When she isn’t lamenting on her life experiences she is calling a spade a spade. “People don’t know that a majority of Mexicans are of African descent.” Karen Hunter’s book  deals with many topics and subjects, but she is deft enough to push people to embrace and value who they are. Karen Hunter knows that the truth tellers of the world are not eagerly received, but she shows true courage when she writes, “We complain about the images of us in movies, yet when we get an opportunity to produce movies, what do we put out: Soul Plane? And, sorry, I love your heart, Tyler Perry, but you’re part of the problem.”

In the book’s most thoughtful moments Karen Hunter speaks of Martin Luther King and his dream, and his lack of and action plan, but many of the points in her book line up directly with the philosophy of Malcolm X, especially on having an economic power base. Ms. Hunter’s book/guidebook cleverly covers many topics and it moves smooth and quickly. Often her book speaks of life instances where she had to humble herself, but at times the tone of the book is elevated.

“Stop Being Niggardly” also takes time out to present a historical perspective, “When filmmaking began, the assault on the black image was heightened. Birth of a Nation, praised as one of the best films ever made is a Ku Klux Klan– inspired movie depicting blacks as savage, childlike, and inhuman beings that needed to be stopped and controlled.” As an added bonus “Niggardly” contains a reprinting of Nannie Helen Boroughs’ book, 12 Things the Negro must do to Improve Himself, with a commentary by Karen Hunter. Karen Hunter deserves a large amount of credit when it comes to telling us all like it is. Stop Being Niggardly: And Nine Other Things Black People Need to Stop Doing is a good book that you need to have on your bookshelf, as it appeals to all races because truth knows no color, or boundaries.

4 out of 5 stars

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